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The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is committed to engage and inspire through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 works of art on a riverfront campus offers more than 95,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.

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Tag Archives: flower

What’s Blooming? – Mahonia Bealei

Mar

06

The Mahonia bealei, also known as Beale’s Barberry or Leatherleaf Mahonia, is an evergreen small shrub native to China. This plant flourishes in…

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What’s Blooming? – Dogwood!

Feb

27

The yellow or green flowers grow in clusters at the center of what seems like petals, which may bloom in white, red or pink, depending on…

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What’s Blooming? Scaevola!

Jun

07

Scaevola is a genus of flowering plants consisting of more than 130 tropical species, with the center of diversity being Australia and Polynesia, including Hawaii.

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What’s Blooming? Daffodils!

Mar

22

The Daffodil, or Narcissus, as it is technically named, originated in Spain and Portugal and consists of over 50 species and about 13,000 hybrids. The ancient Greeks believed the daffodil plant originated from…

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What’s Blooming? Allyssum!

Feb

09

Alyssum is a type of annual that flowers for months, even through the winter in milder climates. It is a hardy native to Southern Europe, but…

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What’s Blooming? Dianthus!

Feb

02

The name Dianthus is from the Greek words dios (“god”) and anthos (“flower”), and was cited by the Greek botanist Theophrastus.

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