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The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is committed to engage and inspire through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 works of art on a riverfront campus offers more than 95,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.

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Our Shared Past: Highlight on Marcus Kenney

Mar

07

Written by Nicole Gaudier

A statement from the artist:

“While studying the selections in the Our Shared Past portfolio, I knew White Shawl was to be my inspiration. After studying the image, I closed my laptop and sketched it on my canvas. Over the course of several weeks, I continued to work on the painting without reviewing the original image, trusting my memory.

In the course of interpreting my memory of the original image, it appears I changed things up a bit. I added a lot more color and indeed, changed the white shawl to green. The women moved outside and became surrounded by butterflies. Did I improve upon the original image? Who can say? Perhaps this is truly how we treat our past. We have brief encounters with it and our memory of it adds or subtracts color and symbols to enhance our original experience. Now looking at the painting, I can see my own past experiences. The lady with the purse became my grandmother and the other lady, my aunt. I can clearly see the two of them. Without intention or knowing I have shared my past.”

Marcus Kenney, A Night to Remember, 2013, from the film still White Shawl, Wall paper, checks, marble dust, oil, acrylic, gold leaf, tissue paper, cards, lace, cigarette paper, blue print, postage stamp, acrylic polymer medium, etc. on canvas

Marcus Kenney, A Night to Remember, 2013, from the film still White Shawl, Wall paper, checks, marble dust, oil, acrylic, gold leaf, tissue paper, cards, lace, cigarette paper, blue print, postage stamp, acrylic polymer medium, etc. on canvas

Marcus Kenney ‘s work A Night to Remember   will be in the Our Shared Past exhibition, on view in the Stein Gallery from December 17, 2013 to May 25, 2014.

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

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Our Shared Past: Highlight on Tony Rodrigues

Mar

04

Written by Nicole Gaudier

A statement from the artist:

“I have an abiding fascination with photography, its role in the evolution of painting and its effect on our perception of the world

Tony Rodrigues, Playground Virility, 2013, from the film still You Can Count Every Rib, Acrylic and polycrylic varnish on canvas

Tony Rodrigues, Playground Virility, 2013, from the film still You Can Count Every Rib, Acrylic and polycrylic varnish on canvas

around us. So, it was an easy decision to contribute to Our Shared Past. Jefree Shalev’s 8mm home movie stills exhibit life in frozen moments that transcend generations. The films are made with affection and lack of pretense. They are documentation of a collective sense of time, life and a desire to remember connections and events that bond friends and families.

My selection of stills was almost immediate.  I related to the slightly built 9 year-old boy who is, at that moment, comfortable in his awkwardness.  Transparent and unguarded with the camera and the person behind it, he is an archetype for pre-pubescent male uncertainty and playfulness.  Also, I instantly recognized Jefree and his sardonic wit, already blooming at that tender age.  Our friendship is based in our mutual love of irony as well as art.

Our Shared Past invites examination of contemporary developments in photography and video in the digital age. We have become exposed to more imagery of everyday life and adept at reading and communicating in visual language.  While not always aesthetically perfect in execution, everyman snapshots and home movies are real and unvarnished glimpses into life and the human condition.”

Tony Rodrigues‘s work Playground Virility  will be in the Our Shared Past exhibition, on view in the Stein Gallery from December 17, 2013 to May 25, 2014.

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

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Camp Cummer!

Mar

03

cghjkuhgyufyCome join in the fun and creativity at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens this summer!

Don’t miss out on the chance to enroll your child in a summer art camp that will stimulate their imagination and creative development skills while building their visual vocabulary through artistic expression in a positive environment. Children of all ages will create a variety of art projects inspired by their exploration of the Cummer Gardens and art galleries including painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed media and clay sculpture.

Enroll your child in up to two weeks of camp!
One RED and one BLUE week.
Monday – Friday, 9am – 3:30pm

campcummer3Elementary School Camp (Entering 1st -6th grade)
(Red) Week 1: June 9-13
(Blue) Week 2: June 16-20
(Red) Week 3: June 23-27
(Blue) Week 4: July 7-11
(Red) Week 5: July 14 -18
(Blue) Week 6: July 21- 25

campcummer4

 

Middle School Camp (Entering 6th -9th grade)
July 28th – August 1st

Extended Care is available for Elementary School Camp ONLY
Morning Care: 8-8:45am- $20 per week
Afternoon Care: 3:30-5pm- $30 per week

For more information or to register please call 904.355.0630, or visit our website.

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Art & Science: Paper – Nutritious and Versatile

Feb

27

 

The White Rowboat, St. John's River by Winslow HomerThe properties of paper and the concerns that surround the care of artwork on paper initially grabbed my interest.  The fact that any damage caused to paper is cumulative and irreversible makes our jobs as caretakers of these treasures even more critical.  A change in relative humidity, temperature, radiation which includes visible light, pollution, or biological factors can destroy a collection.  Degradation of paper can affect its chemical, physical, or optical properties through hydrolysis, oxidation, or crosslinking.  In order, this is a decomposition of a compound due to the addition of water, the change to a compound due to the addition of oxygen, and the connecting of chains of molecules to each other resulting in a change of properties for the compound. Observed physical changes are often a result of chemical changes, but biological factors directly interfere with the integrity of paper as well.

Along with the elements that may treat or hold paper such as sizing, paste, and starches, paper is also a smorgasbord of carbohydrates and proteins. Rodents, insects, and fungi, which includes molds, will feed off of paper; additionally, any dirt or dust will add to the buffet.  Although humans are not equipped with specific bacteria in the digestive system, such as the protozoans that live in the intestinal tract of termites or the bacteria that resides in the rumen of a cow, needed to digest the cellulose of paper into needed nutrients, paper can be used in any garden as compost and mulch.  There is no need to be concerned about the ink, however, since most are carbon and soybean-based nowadays.

DNA 1Besides its nutritional values, it is important to note other properties of paper products and their uses. Being innovated upon for thousands of years, paper is natural, renewable, and recyclable; it can be cut, torn, folded, bent, twisted, crumpled, creped, dissolved, molded, embossed, waxed, glazed, waterproofed, enameled, impregnated, and sensitized. When used in packaging, color-changing paper allows us to see clearly if products are past their sell-by date while scratch and sniff brings perfume ads in magazines to life.  Solar cells, radio identification tags which allow products to be traced at every stage, and batteries can be made from paper. Since it is a cheap and versatile substrate, paper is desirable for printing circuits onto instead of the traditional heavy circuit boards.  Printing electronics on paper reduces environmental impact over traditional methods and allows paper to be interactive.

According to some historians, paper dates back to 105 A.D., but according to recent discoveries, it might be 200 years older than originally calculated which would make paper around 2000 years young. Invented by Ts’ai Lun, a eunuch and official in the royal court of the Chinese Han Dynasty, paper was so revered that Ts’ai Lun eventually was declared God of Stationers, or paper sellers.  Prior to this, writings, drawings, and paintings were done on fabrics, flattened plant material, or prepared animal skin known as parchment.

Though paper derives its name from papyrus, the writing substrate of the Egyptians during 3000 B.C., papyrus is not like our modern paper.  Made from the plant by the same name, Cyperus papyrus, the Egyptians took this herbaceous perennial, a reed, a laid split, and flattened strips next to each other on a flat board.  A second layer of touching strips was laid perpendicular on the first, then covered with muddy water from the Nile, and finally pressed to produce a laminate sheet.  With squared edges, these sheets could be attached to each other to form larger sheets and rolls.  Collectively known as “tapa”, similar writing substrates were used around the world by processing the flattened plant material or the inner bark of paper mulberry, fig, and daphne trees to name a few. As with papyrus, these substrates were either flattened or laminated pieces of material, but these substrates are not the same as the paper we are familiar with today.

Cellulose 1True paper, the paper of Ts’ai Lun onward, uses plant derived materials, and the material is macerated into a pulp of individual fiber strands.  This soft, wet, and shapeless mass of material, also known as pulp, is strained and formed into sheets of paper.  The Chinese initially used paper for wrapping delicate items, but over time, the Chinese developed the paper tea bag, toilet paper, and created magnificent works of art on paper.  The breakdown of materials, including cellulose – a constituent of the plant cell wall, into the individual fibers is what gives paper its unique properties such as versatility of shape, form, and function.

Paper comes in many forms for many different uses.  The fibers of which it is made have come from a variety of components, but its basic production process and essential properties remain the same.  With slight changes or additions, it is still paper, whether it is used for the 500 year old manuscripts from the exhibition Art of Empathy or the more recent photography exhibit titled One Family: Photographs by Vardi Kahana. With such versatility, society will always have a need for paper, and with this need, new life is breathed into paper everyday.

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Our Shared Past: Highlight on Christina Foard

Feb

25

Written by Nicole Gaudier

 Statement from the Artist:

“Although my background training focused on classic and gestural figurative work, I have remained most curious and engaged by painting imagined worlds through abstract forms. I see patterns in land, in people, in spaces which motivate me to respond to my surroundings. My emotional stirrings are reflected in my paintings as well: sensations of falling, flying, floating, sinking, dangling, being trapped, or completely still.

Painting has been a pathway to open and react to memories; and when necessary, reframe and resolve them. Every decision and mark on the canvas changes the entire structure, and I enter into a new puzzle to solve. Therefore, I vacillate between analytical assessment and intuitive response. Letting go of controlled outcomes is a repeated theme in my life philosophy and painting evolution. Taking risks with my materials allows for surprising results and unplanned spaces, and over time a specific language of symbols emerges– affording me a liberated freedom to create my stories without words.”

Christina Foard, The Stacked Wait, 2013, from the film still Picnic in the Trees, Oil on canvas

Christina Foard, The Stacked Wait, 2013, from the film still Picnic in the Trees, Oil on canvas

Christina Foard‘s work  The Stacked Wait will be in the Our Shared Past exhibition, on view in the Stein Gallery from December 17, 2013 to May 25, 2014.

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

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2014 Community First Garden Month at The Cummer

Feb

19

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With the success of last year’s Garden Month, Community First Credit Union and The Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens proudly present its annual celebration, Garden Month at The Cummer! The Cummer will be celebrating its historical gardens with events, programs, classes for adults and children, and Docent led tours throughout the month of March.

To kick off this year’s Garden Month on March 1, The Cummer, with a special thanks to Weaver First Saturday Free for All, will open its doors at 10 AM with free admission for everyone. Before the museum opens, there will be a Plant Sale on the front lawn starting at 9 a.m.  Rain barrels from The St. Johns Riverkeeper will also be sold from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. near the Art Connectins entrance.

During Community Day, there will be live music performed by Tammerlin, studio activities, demonstrations by local CoRK artist Crystal Floyd from 12 PM to 2 PM, and many other activities. The Ixia Chapter of the North Florida Native Plant Society will also be available to answer questions about the gardens as well as provide information on how to care for native plants in your home gardens. With free admission and activities for all, Community Day is an event not to be missed!

Listed below is the schedule of events during Community First Garden Month at The Cummer. Be sure to mark these exciting events in your calendars!

  • March 1st Community Day from 10 AM-4PM (entire museum and gardens), Plant Sale from 9 AM-2 PM (front lawn), & St. John’s Riverkeeper Rain Barrel Sale from 10 AM- 12 PM.
  • March 4th St. John’s Riverkeeper Lecture from 630 PM- 730 PM.
  • March 8th Art for Two: Ages 3-5, Beautiful Blooms! from 1030 AM to 12 PM.
  • March 9th Terrarium Making Workshop with Crystal Floyd from 2 PM-4 PM.
  • March 12th & March 13th Talks & Tea: Celebrating The Cummer Gardens at 130 PM.
  • March 14th Garden Concert: A Night of Motown Music with KTG from 7PM-9PM (Cummer Gardens weather permitting).
  • March 15th Art Adventures: Ages 6-12, Botanical Paintings! from 1030 AM-1230 PM.
  • March 19th An Evening with Doug Tallamy “Bringing Nature Home” from 630 PM- 830PM.
  • March 23rd The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program from 12PM-4 PM.
  • March 31st Garden to Table Dinner from 6 PM-9 PM.

More information for these events and programs can be found on our website.

2014 Garden Month Sponsors

Presenting Sponsor

Community First Credit Union

St. Johns River Level

 Mrs. C. Kirby Alexander

 Mr. & Mrs. David M. Hicks

 Mrs. Edward W. Lane, Jr.

 Mr. and Mrs. Russell B. Newton, Jr.

 Joan & Jim Van Vleck

Azalea Level

 Vicky & Charlie Commander

 Suzanne Hinckley

 Councilman Jim and Robin Love

 Kenyon V. Merritt

Wisteria Level

 Barbara Arnold

 Mr. and Mrs. James I. Vance Berry, Jr.

 Candace & Erie Bridgewater

 Mr. Ryan A. Schwartz 

Community Partners

Chef’s Garden Catering & Events

Jim Draper

Ixia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society

Harbringer Sign

 Pam & Jake Ingram

Mark Grandin Events

St. Johns Riverkeeper

Sunscapes Landscape Design, Inc.

ValleyCrest Landscape Maintenance

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