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Our Shared Past: Highlight on Rachel Levanger

Mar

14

Written by Nicole Gaudier

A statement from the artist:

“I explore a primary theme of the show, nostalgia, not by playing directly into it but by playing off of it orthogonally, bringing the work into the present.  While I do not consider the resulting painting confessional in the strict sense of the term, I looked to leading feminist and confessional artist Tracey Emin for inspiration, particularly her 1995 work “Everyone I Have Ever Slept With” (a.k.a. “The Tent”).  Her piece, listing out the names of everyone she had ever shared a bed with, has a decidedly intimate and nostalgic feel, and so I moved from names to the use of a contemporary symbol which, in its arrangement in a grid, defies narrative and intimacy.  Leveraging techniques in Pop Art (especially Andy Warhol’s use of the repeated image) I aim to both disarm the symbol and render it non-objective, diminishing its power as a political statement and perhaps as an attempt to reclaim my own sexual history.”

Rachel Levanger, My coming of age: boys, 2013, from the film still Boys 2, Acrylic and latex on canvas

Rachel Levanger, My coming of age: boys , 2013, from the film still Boys 2, Acrylic and latex on canvas

Rachel Levanger ‘s work  My coming of age: boys  will be in the Our Shared Past exhibition, on view in the Stein Gallery from December 17, 2013 to May 25, 2014.

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

 

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Our Shared Past: Highlight on Mark George

Mar

11

Written by Nicole Gaudier 

Mark George ‘s work Bobbing  will be in the Our Shared Past exhibition, on view in the Stein Gallery from December 17, 2013 to May 25, 2014.

A statement from Mark George:

“Mark George’s paintings of love, anguish and anxiety spare no emotion, and bare no subliminal message.George’s work demonstrates his commercial art background, graphic design, and the idea of painting.With no visible brushstrokes, the pieces have a flat color quality seen primarily in printed work.

The paintings on the torn panels are an attempt to embody an era of mid-century Americana in advertising and urban street art. The material gives the work an abandoned quality that suggests the piece is not a painting per se, but a relic or illustrative portion of an old billboard or advertisement. The look created is genre crossing: a Dada approach, a Pop sensibility.”

Mark George, Bobbing,2013, from the film still Bobbing, Acrylic & Aerosol on Corrugated Plastic

Mark George, Bobbing, 2013, from the film still Bobbing, Acrylic & Aerosol on Corrugated Plastic

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

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A Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art

Mar

10

James Karales, Selma to Montgomery March, 1965, Gelatin silver print, High Museum of Art, Atlanta

James Karales, Selma to Montgomery March, 1965, Gelatin silver print, High Museum of Art, Atlanta

Written by Caitlyn Gutierrez, Curatorial Intern

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens would like to present A Commemoration of the Civil Rights Movement: Photography from the High Museum of Art. This exhibit is composed of 22 photographic images captured over the course of the Civil Rights Movement, from 1956 – 1968. These photographs were taken by various contemporary photographers, including Bob Adelman, Danny Lyon, James Karales, and Steve Schapiro.

 

Organized by the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, the exhibition brings these images together to document the events and people of the movement, from segregation to freedom.  The earliest photographs are from 1956, and include an Unknown Photographer’s image of Rosa Parks Being Fingerprinted, Montgomery, Alabama, February 22, and Ernest Withers’ First Desegregated Bus Ride, Montgomery, AL., Dec..

Rosa Parks Being Fingerprinted, Montgomery, Alabama, February 22, 1956

Unknown Photographer, Rosa Parks Being Fingerprinted, Montgomery, Alabama, February 22, 1956, Gelatin silver print, High Museum of Art, Atlanta

 

Many of the photographs in the exhibition have captured the people who participated in the various marches and demonstrations that occurred during the Civil Rights Movement. This has worked to immortalize some of the brave men and women who peacefully pursued their freedom, through discrimination and, in some cases, violent attacks upon themselves. One of these incidents, the police attack on young demonstrators in Kelly Ingram Park, was documented in a photograph by Bob Adelman on May 3, 1963.

Although some of the people in the images remain anonymous, there is also a great deal of pictures in the exhibition that hold familiar and well known faces in their frame. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is a few of the exhibition images, along with other activists including Stokeley Carmichael, Andrew Young, John Lewis, and Fannie Lou Hamer.

Steve Schapiro, Andrew Young, Martin Luther King Jr., and John Lewis, Selma, Alabama, 1965, Gelatin silver print, High Museum of Art, Atlanta

Steve Schapiro, Andrew Young, Martin Luther King Jr., and John Lewis, Selma, Alabama, 1965, Gelatin silver print, High Museum of Art, Atlanta

This exhibition will be held in the Milner Gallery from February 28 to November 2, 2014.

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Top 10 Facts About Families During The Holocaust

Mar

10

Written by Caitlyn Gutierrez, Curatorial Intern

Three Brothers

Three Brothers, Tel Aviv                                1992

10           Even before the Holocaust, many Jewish families began to flee their homelands because of discrimination

9              A large number of Jewish families and individuals that were trying to emigrate were aided by the Japanese and granted visas to help them escape through China and Japan on their way to safe countries, such as the United States, Palestine, or other countries that would accept them.

The grandchildren of Cousin Hannan

The grandchildren of cousin Hannan, Kiryat Sefer, Modi’in Ilit     2005

8              Many parents chose to hide their children, often in plain sight as non-Jewish orphans of war, in an effort to ensure their children’s survival.

7              Some families desire to remain together often left them with the only option of going into hiding, which was extremely difficult and forced them to live cut off from the world for long periods of time, sometimes years.

6              As families, friends, and neighbors began to be forced apart from each other, a common promise arose as they each vowed to find one another and rebuild their lives once they were freed or felt safe to return.

My mother Rivka with her sisters Lea and Esther

Three Sisters, Tel Aviv     1992

5              In the concentration camps the inmates were separated by gender, thus forcing another degree of separation on families; however this did allow for small fragments of families to maintain contact, such as Vardi’s mother and her sisters.

4              The need for a familial connection during the Holocaust was so strong that some inmates, who were separated from their entire family and any other familiar faces, created their own alternate kind of family.

3              Memories of one’s family often served as a source of strength for many inmates in the concentration camps.

My cousin Yonina with her daughter Neta

Cousin Yonina and her daughter Neta    2003

2              Woman survivors have mentioned that conversations of recipes, family life, or holiday traditions worked to help them cope with the life in the camps and the violence around them.

My mother Rivka with my children Gil and Roni_small

My mother Rivka and my children Gil and Roni       2003

1              The desire for the repair of familial bonds and its significance was especially apparent when survivors began to create or set up what remained of their families immediately after the war and their freedom.

After the Holocaust the survivors and families emerged from the camps and hiding with a tremendous amount of hope. They looked to the future as a wonderful opportunity to grow and thrive, by trying to put everything that had happened behind them, and though it remained in their memories (as it has for everyone throughout the world) it never hindered their desire and hopefulness for a better future for themselves and their families. Now the rest of the world has joined these families in their hopeful outlook and in taking action and responsibility to prevent and eliminate anything similar from occuring again worldwide.

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Our Shared Past: Highlight on Marcus Kenney

Mar

07

Written by Nicole Gaudier

A statement from the artist:

“While studying the selections in the Our Shared Past portfolio, I knew White Shawl was to be my inspiration. After studying the image, I closed my laptop and sketched it on my canvas. Over the course of several weeks, I continued to work on the painting without reviewing the original image, trusting my memory.

In the course of interpreting my memory of the original image, it appears I changed things up a bit. I added a lot more color and indeed, changed the white shawl to green. The women moved outside and became surrounded by butterflies. Did I improve upon the original image? Who can say? Perhaps this is truly how we treat our past. We have brief encounters with it and our memory of it adds or subtracts color and symbols to enhance our original experience. Now looking at the painting, I can see my own past experiences. The lady with the purse became my grandmother and the other lady, my aunt. I can clearly see the two of them. Without intention or knowing I have shared my past.”

Marcus Kenney, A Night to Remember, 2013, from the film still White Shawl, Wall paper, checks, marble dust, oil, acrylic, gold leaf, tissue paper, cards, lace, cigarette paper, blue print, postage stamp, acrylic polymer medium, etc. on canvas

Marcus Kenney, A Night to Remember, 2013, from the film still White Shawl, Wall paper, checks, marble dust, oil, acrylic, gold leaf, tissue paper, cards, lace, cigarette paper, blue print, postage stamp, acrylic polymer medium, etc. on canvas

Marcus Kenney ‘s work A Night to Remember   will be in the Our Shared Past exhibition, on view in the Stein Gallery from December 17, 2013 to May 25, 2014.

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

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Our Shared Past: Highlight on Tony Rodrigues

Mar

04

Written by Nicole Gaudier

A statement from the artist:

“I have an abiding fascination with photography, its role in the evolution of painting and its effect on our perception of the world

Tony Rodrigues, Playground Virility, 2013, from the film still You Can Count Every Rib, Acrylic and polycrylic varnish on canvas

Tony Rodrigues, Playground Virility, 2013, from the film still You Can Count Every Rib, Acrylic and polycrylic varnish on canvas

around us. So, it was an easy decision to contribute to Our Shared Past. Jefree Shalev’s 8mm home movie stills exhibit life in frozen moments that transcend generations. The films are made with affection and lack of pretense. They are documentation of a collective sense of time, life and a desire to remember connections and events that bond friends and families.

My selection of stills was almost immediate.  I related to the slightly built 9 year-old boy who is, at that moment, comfortable in his awkwardness.  Transparent and unguarded with the camera and the person behind it, he is an archetype for pre-pubescent male uncertainty and playfulness.  Also, I instantly recognized Jefree and his sardonic wit, already blooming at that tender age.  Our friendship is based in our mutual love of irony as well as art.

Our Shared Past invites examination of contemporary developments in photography and video in the digital age. We have become exposed to more imagery of everyday life and adept at reading and communicating in visual language.  While not always aesthetically perfect in execution, everyman snapshots and home movies are real and unvarnished glimpses into life and the human condition.”

Tony Rodrigues‘s work Playground Virility  will be in the Our Shared Past exhibition, on view in the Stein Gallery from December 17, 2013 to May 25, 2014.

There will be artist appearances at the Stein Gallery January through April. Each Saturday, artists from the exhibition will be in the Gallery from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.  Others will make appearances throughout the day on Weaver Free Saturdays, and on Tuesday evenings during the exhibition.

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