Cummer Resources

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens is committed to engage and inspire through the arts, gardens and education. A permanent collection of nearly 5,000 works of art on a riverfront campus offers more than 95,000 annual visitors a truly unique experience on the First Coast. Nationally recognized education programs serve adults and children of all abilities.

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January Docent of the Month: Ric Goodman

Jan

09

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When one of the Museum’s educators told Ric Goodman that he would be the Museum’s Docent of the Month for January, his response was “Are you sure about this?” It’s that humble mentality that is so prominent in the Cummer’s Docent Corps. These individuals selflessly give to the Museum and we are so grateful for that.

So- in Ric’s own words, here is a little about himself:

“I found that once I became semi-retired I wanted to get active with some sort of professional organization as a volunteer. I was approached by a friend and docent and invited to attend a meeting. I was immediately impressed with the other docents and vibrant education staff. That was a little over 2 years ago and I currently participate weekly in giving school tours to kids from Kindergarten to 5th grade. The best part of this volunteer involvement is seeing the interest and excitement the kids have when they enter the Cummer. But, also being able to listen and learn all about art and the collection we have here in Riverside is so rewarding. And such a pleasure to keep learning things that you did not appreciate as a younger person. Aside from the time at the museum, I enjoy traveling in the US and Europe and spending time trying to keep up with a very busy eight year old granddaughter.”

If you see Ric around the campus, please give him a smile or a high five and thank him for his dedication to education at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens!

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Weaver First Saturday Free for All

Jan

02

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Welcome the New Year with a FREE trip to the Museum! Join us for Weaver First Saturday Free for All tomorrow, January 3rd.

This is the last weekend of Icons of Style: Fashion Makers, Models and Images so don’t miss your chance to see this incredible show before it heads back to home to MFA Boston.

Enjoy live music in the Cafe from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. from This Frontier Needs Heroes. Join a selection of musicians from Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra for Cover the Town with Sound, in the Stein Gallery at 2 p.m.

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Rothko to Richter: Mark-Making in Abstract Painting from the Collection of Preston H. Haskell

Dec

23

Organized by the Princeton University Art Museum

Gerhard Richter, Untitled, 1986, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell.  Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng.  © 2015 Gerhard Richter.

Gerhard Richter, Untitled, 1986, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell. Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng. © 2015 Gerhard Richter.

An exciting collection of mid-20th Century art will be highlighted this spring at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens. Rothko to Richter: Mark-Making in Abstract Painting from the Collection of Preston H. Haskell, organized by the Princeton University Art Museum, will be on display January 30 through April 22.

Jack Goldstein, Untitled, 1986, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell.  Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng.  © 2015 Estate of Jack Goldstein.

Jack Goldstein, Untitled, 1986, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell. Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng. © 2015 Estate of Jack Goldstein.

Rivaled only by the early years of the 1910s, when abstraction was pioneered in Europe and America, the 40-year period between 1950 and 1990 witnessed dramatic developments in abstract art. This exhibition features 27 paintings by some of the era’s most important artists, including Karel Appel, Helen Frankenthaler, Hans Hofmann, Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, Morris Louis, Joan Mitchell, Robert Motherwell, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, and Mark Rothko. Experimentation with various methods of producing an abstraction and applying paint to a surface was common during this time, alternately emphasizing or suppressing traces of the artist’s touch. Selected from the collection of Preston H. Haskell, these works together offer a window into the evolution of process, mark-making, and abstraction in the second half of the 20th century.

The works exhibited show this vast experimentation. For many artists, “a direct, transparent relationship exists between mark and method, a one-to-one correspondence between every stroke of paint and every movement of the artist’s hand,” says Baum. “However, not every artist subscribed to this approach. Several developed techniques designed to depersonalize the act of mark-making, to literally divorce the mark from the artist’s hand. Some even went so far as to erase the traces their tools left behind, effacing marks as soon as they were created. Instead of flaunting the process by which their paintings were produced, these artists dissimulated.”

Joan Mitchell, Champs, 1990, oil on canvas, Collection of Preston H.Haskell.  Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng.  © 2015 Estate of Joan Mitchell.

Joan Mitchell, Champs, 1990, oil on canvas, Collection of Preston H.Haskell. Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng. © 2015 Estate of Joan Mitchell.

Visitors will have the opportunity to connect to Rothko to Richter through a variety of public programs. In addition to the community opening on Thursday, January 29, other special programs include:

Member’s Preview
January 29 | 12 to 4 p.m.
Free for Members Only
No reservation needed

As a special benefit, Museum Members are invited to preview Rothko to Richter: Mark-Making in Abstract Painting from the Collection of Preston H. Haskell, organized by the Princeton University Art Museum before it opens to the general public.  Get a first look at this exciting exhibition, featuring 27 paintings by some of the 20th century’s most important abstract artists.

  • Members are invited to an exclusive preview of the exhibition, before it opens to the public.
  • Experience docent led tours every hour on the hour from our knowledgeable staff and docent team, beginning at 12 p.m. Tours will begin at the title wall of the Gallery.
  • Members can enjoy a 20% off discount in the Cummer Shop and at the Cummer Café (excluding beverages).

*Reservations for a table at the Cummer Café are highly recommended.

For further information, please contact the Membership Office at 904.899.6007.

Michael Goldberg, The Keep, 1958, oil on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell.  Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng.  © 2015 Estate of Michael Goldberg.

Michael Goldberg, The Keep, 1958, oil on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell. Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng. © 2015 Estate of Michael Goldberg.

Community Opening Party
January 29 | 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Members Free, Non-Members $10
RSVP Required – Click here to register online.

In honor of the most anticipated exhibition of the year, we invite you to come celebrate the opening of Rothko to Richter: Mark-Making in Abstract Painting from the Collection of Preston H. Haskell, organized by the Princeton University Art Museum. Peruse the new exhibition, enjoy light nibbles, beer and wine, and live music.

*Entry includes one beverage ticket per person. Additional beverages will be available for purchase.

5 p.m. – Doors open
5 to 8 p.m. – Live music with Radio Love, small bites, and drinks, with remarks by Chief Curator Holly Keris from 7 to 7:15 p.m.

For further information, please contact the Events & Programs Office at 904.899.6038 or events@cummermuseum.org.

Conversations & Cocktails with Collector Preston Haskell and Curator Kelly Baum on the art of the Haskell Collection
February 12
 | 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Members $25, Non-Members $35, Up & Cummers Members $20
Registration Required – Click here to register

Jack Goldstein, Untitled, 1985, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell.  Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng.  © 2015 Estate of Jack Goldstein.

Jack Goldstein, Untitled, 1985, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Preston H. Haskell. Photograph courtesy of Douglas J. Eng. © 2015 Estate of Jack Goldstein.

Talks & Tea: The Art of the Haskell Collection
February 18 | 1:30 p.m.
February 19
 | 1:30 p.m.
Members and Non-Members $6
Registration Required
Click here to register for Wednesday
Click here to register for Thursday

Sunday Classical Concert featuring Contemporary Works with Benjamin Sung
March 29 | 1:30 p.m.
Free with Museum Admission
Registration Required – Click here to register

For further information or to make your required reservation, please contact the Cummer Museum’s Events & Programs Office at 904.899.6038 or reserve your tickets online at cummermuseum.org.

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December’s Docents of the Month

Dec

18

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Pat and David Balanky

We are so thankful for our docents and each month we love to highlight someone who plays an integral role in helping the Museum’s education team with tours of the campus. This month we are honoring Pat and David Balanky who generously give their time to the Cummer Museum. We asked them to tell us a little more about themselves and why this work is so special to them!

Here’s what they had to say:

Cummer: Why did you want to be a docent and how long have you been with the Museum?
Pat: I am a native of So. Calif.  I met my true love, when he was in the U.S. Navy.  We married in 1954 and returned to his home town of Jacksonville.  We both furthered our life education.  Nursing was my choice and David’s was Criminology.  We raised three children and are now enjoying three grandkids!
David: We decided to become docents at the urging of our friend, Anne Flora.  We have made travel a goal in our lives and always enjoyed the museums, culture and art, so the docent classes seemed like a great opportunity to continue learning together!  Volunteering has been a life purpose, especially with kids.

C: What is your favorite part of this job?

P&D: It is so much fun to see the children explore and learn and play in the Cummer.  The art educators do a terrific job planning the tours and helping us present them.

C: What is your favorite thing to do when you aren’t generously donating your time to the Museum?

D&P: We are involved in helping support the orthopedic and prosthetic program for a hospital in Milot, Haiti.  In addition to that we continue to enjoy travels, friends and family.

Thanks to Pat and David for working so hard for the institution! If you see them around the Museum, please thank them for the dedication and important service!

 

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The Science of Fashion

Dec

18

Written By: Karl Boecklen, Museum Educator

Have you seen the fashion at the Cummer Museum? And what have you seen?

einsteinIs their more to fashion than meets the eye? Can we dissect it into a system of parts, determine cause and effect, test it, and duplicate the results? Is fashion a product or a producer, do the clothes make the person or the person make the clothes? How much of fashion is art? How much is science? I do not know.

mr. rogersMy understanding of fashion is simple, mostly, dress for the weather. When cold, a wool button down pocketed sweater à la Mr. Rogers or Albert Einstein does very well. I guess this is utility over art. The science of the sweater is in the trapped air that produces a thermal insulation, and in the loose fit and properties of the material that allows moisture to escape (wet clothes will conduct heat away from the body more quickly than dry clothes). As far as for materials, wool is a very good natural fiber, as over a billion sheep worldwide will attest to.

microscopic cross section of wool fiber

Wool fibers are very interesting in their properties and along with modern spinning techniques have one of the highest insulation to weight ratios. In other words, a very warm sweater can be very light in weight; and perhaps less bulky and more stylish. Being hygroscopic (attracting moisture), wool will absorb moisture vapor from the skin and release it out into the drier air. Wool also tends to be mold and mildew resistant and reduce body odor.

When the wool fibers do get wet, the water is taken inside the fiber and away from the body. In addition to keeping the body (and the fiber as a whole) dry; this action is actually a chemical reaction that releases heat. The breaking of a hydrogen bond of the water molecule binds the water into the structure of the wool fiber thus generating heat. This heat is captured in the air pockets formed by the many fibers. Interesting enough, when the moisture releases, it takes up heat away from the air pockets.

sheepSo, on a cool damp night, the wool fibers take up moisture from the air and create warmth amongst the many fibers. As the sun rises, warming and drying the air, moisture is released and the heat stored in the fibers with it. Not a bad system that works, both, for the herd of wooly sheep posing on the hillside and those outfitted with the latest style of Mr. Roger’s sweater.

Though this discussion supplies some revelations behind the choice of materials for a piece of clothing, and enters into the realm of fiber and textile science; it does not say much about how it connects to fashion. And fashion is what is happening at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.

The Cummer Museum has stepped into the world of fashion with two of its latest exhibitions; Icons of Style: Fashion Makers, Models, and Images, exhibiting until January 4th and Best Dressed exhibiting until February 8th, 2015.

Icons looks to the runways to see the interconnected roles of fashion’s makers, the models who wear their designs, and the media that disseminate those looks to the world, while, Best Dressed highlights historical works that explore the significance of clothing and fashion.icon dress

Well, fashion is one of those things that most of us know what it is when we talk about it, but, we can’t tell you what it is when asked. The question of whether fashion is art has always been debated but a strange consensus seems to occur. Art is not only in the piece of clothing, but in how it is presented or worn.

Arguments aside that question whether fashion is art; these two exhibits express what has been said and repeated, that fashion is where art, culture and history intersect; a push and pull of elements where art can be derived from fashion or fashion can be an outlet for art.

I am willing to take this one step further, in that science is as much of culture and history, in that science is a system of studying, testing, and experimenting on things in nature; science exists at this intersect as well.

dr seussIt intersects when humans first decided to adorn their bodies with the patterns of nature they saw around them. By experimenting with plants and soil, they created dyes to color themselves with unique designs that connected them to nature and each other. Perhaps like the Sneetches of Dr. Seuss, the possession of these designs implied a certain status or currency of being.
As weather and migration dictated, clothes came about. Molecular biologists say this was at least 100,000 years ago citing that is when body lice that live in the seams of our clothing, diverged genetically from head lice that live on the hairs of our bodies.

Developed by availability of resources, purpose, shared stories, technology, status of the individual or group, and expression, clothes and fashion evolve to people’s needs and whimsy. But, what does fashion do to people? Surprisingly, fashion may be able to push back and change us.

Next time, clothes might actually make the person.

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What happened to looted art during WWII?

Dec

17

You might be familiar with a recent story on the cover of Folio Weekly about stolen art and how it relates to the Cummer Museum. In recent years the Museum has learned of the unexpected provenance of a Meissen porcelain piece, as well as the Vanitas painting that hangs in the Semmes Gallery at the Museum.

On January 13th at 7 p.m., you won’t want to miss a very interesting talk led by the Cummer Museum’s Chief Curator, Holly Keris. Join her as she discusses artwork and other cultural property looted by the Nazis during WWII and how the present day impact on the Museum. This free talk is first come, first seated and will be held in the Hixon Auditorium.

 

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