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In the Gallery: Dancer by Enzo Torcoletti

Jul

31

Written by Kiani Ned, Curatorial Intern 

Enzo Torcoletti (Italian-American, 1943-), Dancer, 1985, bronze, 22” high, Purchased with funds from Membership Contributors, AP.1991.11.1

Enzo Torcoletti (Italian-American, 1943-), Dancer, 1985, bronze, 22” high, Purchased with funds from Membership Contributors, AP.1991.11.1

Enzo Torcoletti grew up the small medieval Italian town of Fano, Italy where he was exposed to classical Roman artifacts and art. Torcoletti later moved to North America where he studied in Canada, continued his studies at Florida State University to complete his M.F.A. and then began teaching art history and sculpture at Flagler College in St. Augustine, Florida.

Torcoletti’s main subject matter is one of fame in classical art; the female torso. His sculptures embody sensuality in that the expression of the human body is captured in the simplistic form of the torso without the assistance of arms, hands or head to indicate any emotion. Torcoletti’s exquisite craftmanship allows the seemingly expressionless female torso to become both streamlined and erotic. Particularly, the figure of the Dancer is both smooth and sensuous as Torcoletti has allowed the sculpture to be open to its audience through the careful command of the bronze medium. The figure of the Dancer appears to be forever suspended in a moment of pure emotion and movement that is the art of dance.

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